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  • About by: Mike

    March 15, 2010, 07:17

    4Information.com 4Internet, LLC 8275 South Eastern Avenue Suite 200-265 Las Vegas, NV 89123 (702) 997-4NET (4638)

  • Animals by: Mike

    March 16, 2010, 06:22

    Welcome to the Animals section.

  • Contact 4Information by: Mike

    March 16, 2010, 06:23

    Contact 4Information.com

  • Sports by: Mike

    March 16, 2010, 06:24

    The Sports section: This page is for updated sports information such as scores and sports news. If you are looking for sports products, try the following…

  • Family by: Mike

    March 16, 2010, 06:25

    Family Section: Here you will find something for every member of the family.

  • Physics by: Mike

    March 16, 2010, 06:28

    Whether you are interested in the mysteries of the universe or just why that apple fell on Newton's head, this section will teach you about the area of physics…

  • Science by: Mike

    March 17, 2010, 18:46

    Science Section:

  • Financial by: Mike

    March 17, 2010, 18:46

    Financial Section: Below are the most common stock market indices. Dow Jones Industrial Average Stocks: NASDAQ Composite Index: …

  • Medical by: Mike

    March 17, 2010, 18:47

    Medical Section:

  • Privacy by: Mike

    March 22, 2010, 01:26

    4Information.com is committed to protecting your privacy and developing technology that gives you the most powerful and safe online experience. This…

  • Terms by: Mike

    March 22, 2010, 07:09

    AGREEMENT BETWEEN USER AND 4Information.com The 4Information.com Web Site is comprised of various Web pages operated by 4Information.com. The…

  • Site Map by: Mike

    March 25, 2010, 02:48

    This page contains the site table of contents. Use it to quickly find content on this website.

  • Arts by: Mike

    March 25, 2010, 02:59

    Arts Section:

  • Entertainment by: Mike

    March 25, 2010, 03:05

    Entertainment Section: This section is devoted to entertainment. Books, Movies, Television, Theater, Music and more are contained within this section.

  • Business by: Mike

    March 25, 2010, 03:26

    Business Section: From small to large business, personal to corporation, profit to non-profit, this section has the information you need.

  • Home by: Mike

    March 25, 2010, 03:29

    Home Section: The home section is a great place to find information concerning the place you spend the most amount of time: Your Home.

  • Education by: Mike

    March 25, 2010, 03:33

    Education Section: Reading, writing, arithmatic, history, social studies, economics, physics, biology, and more. Young students and Old will find…

  • Reference by: Mike

    March 25, 2010, 05:26

    Reference Section: This section contains both basic and advanced reference materials. Coming soon will be a dictionary, thesaurus, patent lookups, and…

  • Health by: Mike

    March 25, 2010, 05:42

    Health Section: This section is devoted to health, fitness, and medicine. Learn about the latest medical discoveries, how to stay fit, and medical care.

  • Blog by: Mike

    March 28, 2010, 14:16

    No description found for this item.

  • Travel by: Mike

    April 28, 2010, 13:38

    Welcome to the Travel Section.


Blog Posts

  • General  (1)
    • What is 4information.com all about? by: Mike

      March 15, 2010, 11:38

      Well... 4Information is about finding the information you need. Sometimes this is information you need to get through your day. Sometimes its just for…

  • History  (1)
    • Who are the Anzacs? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      This is a name often applied collectively to the people of Australia and New Zealand. It originated during the First World War. The Australian and New Zealand…

  • Trivia  (258)

    “Non-Trivial Trivial” that is both educational and fun.

    • What is 4information.com all about? by: Mike

      March 15, 2010, 11:38

      Well... 4Information is about finding the information you need. Sometimes this is information you need to get through your day. Sometimes its just for…

    • The Physics of "Lost" by: Mike

      March 16, 2010, 03:39

      If you have been following the television show "Lost" you have probably noticed some hot topics of modern physics making it into the storyline. There are quite…

    • Can a snake jump off the ground? by: Mike

      March 16, 2010, 05:51

      The popular notion that ordinary snakes can jump off the ground is erroneous; few if any large snakes can leap entirely from the ground. Most snakes "strike"…

    • What is Quantum Physics? by: Mike

      March 18, 2010, 00:29

      What is Quantum Physics?

    • What is the difference between Newtonian and Quantum Physics? by: Mike

      March 18, 2010, 03:50

      Everyone has heard the story of Issac Newton being struck on the head by a falling apple. This famous story perfectly illustrates Newtonian physics. Simply…

    • What is Bells Theorem? by: Mike

      March 18, 2010, 03:54

      Bells Theorem is one of the most incredible theorems in physics.

    • Who said: "Make two blades of grass grow where only one grew before"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 03:29

      This common saying is based on a quotation in Jonathan Swift's Travels of Lemuel Gulliver, first published in 1726. In the chapter entitled Voyage to Brobdingna…

    • Why did Alexander weep? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 04:57

      If Alexander the Great wept at all he did not "weep for other worlds to conquer," as the old saying has it, but because there being so many worlds he was…

    • Does the ostrich bury its head in the sand? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 04:57

      There is a widespread belief that when an ostrich wishes to hide it buries its head in the sand and imagines that it cannot be seen because it cannot see.…

    • How did grapefruit get its name? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:07

      This name arose from the fact that the fruit on a heavy-laden tree often suggests a huge cluster of grapes. Sometimes as many as forty or fifty large grapefruit…

    • Which is correct, "burnsides" or "sideburns"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:07

      The original and correct form is burnsides. It is derived from the name of Ambrose E. Burnside, a Federal general during the Civil War, 'who was in the habit…

    • What are secondary schools? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:07

      In 1930 the United States Bureau of Education issued a bulletin on secondary education. Those in charge of the work were surprised to learn that very few…

    • Does the giraffe have a voice? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:07

      It is commonly said that the giraffe is absolutely voiceless and is the only four-footed mammal that does not make some vocal sound characteristic of the…

    • How did "straw" get into "strawberry"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:07

      This question has given etymologists much trouble and the exact application of straw in strawberry is not known beyond doubt. In no other language is the word…

    • What is the difference between bobwhites and quails? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:07

      Many people seem to be under the impression that the bobwhite and the quail are distinct species of bird. Bobwhiite is merely the common name for the native…

    • When should "esquire" be used after a name? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      No description found for this item.

    • How did "boycott" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      No description found for this item.

    • What is a turnpike road? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Turnpike in this connection is synonymous with tollgate or tollbar. It refers to a horizontal barrier, such as a pole or pike turning on a vertical pin, set up…

    • Do stones grow? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      The notion that unattached stones grow in size and even multiply in numbers as the result of their growth has existed in parts of England for centuries. Rock…

    • What state touches only one other state? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      No description found for this item.

    • What is a bee martin? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Bee martin and bee bird are merely popular names for the common American kingbird, a member of the flycatcher family. This species lives chiefly on insects…

    • Are shoes ever actually made of kangaroo leather? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Kangaroo skin is soft, tough and fine-grained and makes an excellent leather for shoes and gloves. Before this fact was discovered kangaroos in Australia were…

    • Do fish find the bait by sight or smell? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      The sense of smell is highly developed in fish and it is probably mainly through this sense that they Iocate their food. Scientists, however, have not yet been…

    • Why is New York called Gotham? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Gotham was first applied to New York in 1807 by Washington Irving in one of the Salmagundi Papers. It was merely a good-natured satire upon the supposed…

    • What causes soot in chimneys? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      The soot that forms in chimneys and stovepipes is a black deposit from wood, coal, oil or other fuel and consists of a combination of partly burned carbon, ash…

    • Why do some San Francisco people object to the term "Frisco?" by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Residents of San Francisco traditionally object to the curt nickname on the ground that it lacks dignity as well as distinctiveness, there being villages and…

    • What causes the ticking sound in wood? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      A peculiar noise somewhat resembling the ticking of a watch is made by various species of insects, such as the powder-post beetles, which bore into the walls…

    • What is a coolie? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Some authorities derive coolie from Chinese too ("painful" or "afflicted") and lee ("strength" or "energy"). According to this theory, coolie originally…

    • Does the hair grow after death? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Scientists differ somewhat on this subject, but the weight of authority favors the view that hair/ including the beard, ceases to grow at death. Some of the…

    • What is the third degree? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      The term "Third Degree" is thought to originate during medieval times, when torture was often used. Torture was categorized by degree. The Third degree was…

    • How large is a bear cub at birth? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      A bear cub at birth is smaller in proportion to the size of the mother than the young of any other mammal except marsupials. When born a cub is eight or nine…

    • Is there a species of white squirrel? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      There is no distinct species of white tree squirrel in the United States. All white-squirrels, says the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, are mutations…

    • How did "halcyon days" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Halcyon days, meaning a time of peace and tranquillity, is an ancient phrase that came to us from Greek mythology. According to the most usual version of the…

    • What is goldbeaters' skin? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Goldbeaters' skin is a fine membrane made of the outer coat of the blind gut in cattle and is used by goldbeaters to separate the leaves of metal during the…

    • Where is the geographical center of the United States? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      There is no known method by which the exact geographical center of a given territory can be located. According to the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey,…

    • What is the Queen of the Antilles? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Cuba is known as the Queen, Gem or Pearl of the Antilles because it is the largest and richest of all the West Indian islands. Antilla, a supposed island in…

    • Is a pair of twins two or four persons? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Pair is derived through French from Latin paria ("equal"), and signifies "two." Twin comes from a root meaning "two" and means the same thing literally. As a…

    • How did "crank" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      No description found for this item.

    • What was the longest sentence ever uttered by a parrot? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      It is very difficult to obtain authentic information relative to the longest sentences or series of consecutive words ever spoken by parrots. The size of the…

    • Why does the old moon sit in the lap of the new? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Frequently, during the phase of the moon popularly called new, the dim form of the full moon can be seen within the crescent of the new. This is known as…

    • What is meant by "the sun drawing water"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      Sometimes beams of sunlight appear-as streaks running from the sun toward the horizon. This is commonly called the sun drawing water, from the popular belief…

    • Why are dinner coats called tuxedos? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      The tuxedo dinner jacket, received its name from the Tuxedo Club at Tuxedo Park, which is in Orange County, New York, near the New Jersey line and about forty…

    • Is white a color? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      No description found for this item.

    • What requires more force, filling an elevated tank through the bottom or filling it by means of a pipe leading over the top? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      The answer is that more work or force is required when the water is pumped over the top of the tank. Contrary to the popular notion, the water going into the…

    • What is a Pyrrhic victory? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:08

      A ruinous victory or a success gained at too great a cost is known as a Pyrrhic victory in allusion to a remark ascribed to King Pyrrhus of Epirus in Greece…

    • How did "tight as Dick's hatband" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      The Dick in this expression is supposed to refer to Richard Cromwell, son of Oliver Cromwell, the Protector. Richard unsuccessfully attempted to carry on the…

    • Does it ever rain frogs and fish? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      No popular belief is more firmly fixed than that frogs, fish, snakes, clams, eels, turtles, angleworms and other living creatures are drawn up into the clouds…

    • Does "dickens" refer to Charles Dickens? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      Dickens as an interjectional expression signifying astonishment, impatience or irritation is in no way related to the surname of Charles Dickens, the famous…

    • Why is the great African desert called the Sahara? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      No description found for this item.

    • How is "ye" pronounced in "ye good old days"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      "Ye" in such phrases as "Ye good old days" and "Ye Old Coffee Shoppe" is merely the Anglo-Saxon or Old English method of writing the article "The." However,…

    • Why were the Black Hills so called? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      Black Hills is a literal translation of the name given by the Sioux Indians to the mountainous region in western South Dakota. In the Dakota tongue the name…

    • Do the Great Lakes ever freeze over? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      Notwithstanding numerous reports to the contrary, the United States Geological Survey is of the opinion that none of the Great Lakes ever freezes over…

    • Who was "that man"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      Among the Methuselahs of riddledom few present themselves for solution more frequently than the following brain teaser: "Brothers and sisters I have none, but…

    • What animal washes its food? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      The raccoon washes or soaks its food before eating, and it was the original "dunker." It holds the food in its fore paws and shakes it in the water. The coon…

    • Why does "Ib." stand for "pound"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      No description found for this item.

    • What are crocodile tears? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      Crocodile tears are hypocritical tears or pretended grief. The phrase alludes to an old myth that crocodiles moan and sigh like distressed human beings to…

    • Why is the British court called the Court of "St. James's"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      No description found for this item.

    • What is the origin of the word moron? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      No description found for this item.

    • What is black frost? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      Black frost is a popular term that originally denoted any freeze not accompanied by white frost. According to the United States Weather Bureau, the term now…

    • Why do dogs turn around before lying down? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      Nearly everybody has observed that some dogs often turn around several times before lying down. Charles Darwin said he had seen a dog turn around twenty times…

    • What is "lead" in pencils? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      The lead in modern pencils and crayons is natural graphite mixed with clay to give it the desired degree of hardness. Graphite, one of the softest of minerals,…

    • What forms the boundary between Africa and Asia? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      The narrowest strip of land between Asia and Africa is, the Isthmus of Suez through which the Suez Canal was cut. Hence the logical geographical boundary…

    • Is the thumb a finger? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      No description found for this item.

    • What does "laissez faire" mean? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      Laissez faire (pronounced lessay-farr) is a French phrase literally meaning "let do." In economics it is applied to a policy of minimum interference with…

    • Why is the Kentucky-Tennessee boundary crooked? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      No description found for this item.

    • What causes thunder? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      Theories seeking to explain the cause of thunder have been revised many times since the days of the Greek philosophers who believed that thunder was caused by…

    • Who said they would rather live in Hell than Texas? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      "If I owned Texas and Hell I would rent out Texas and live in Hell," is attributed to General Philip H. Sheridan. One would naturally suppose the remark was…

    • How did the Andes Mountains receive their name? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      No description found for this item.

    • What is a mutual admiration society? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      A mutual admiration society is a group of literary logrollers. One writer praises the work of another with the implied understanding that when he publishes…

    • Is it easier to swim in deep water? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      No description found for this item.

    • Do porcupines, shoot their-quills? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      No description found for this item.

    • What famous conqueror was born in Europe, died in Asia, and was buriedin Africa? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      Alexander the Great was born in Macedonia in Europe. He died at Babylon in Asia, and he was buried at Alexandria in Africa. Ancient accounts of Alexander's…

    • Can sailing ships travel faster than the mad? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      Ordinary sailing ships cannot sail faster than the wind driving them. There is too much friction for that to happen. In fact, no kind of sailing craft can sail…

    • What is sheet lightning? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      No description found for this item.

    • What are the Baomes laws? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:09

      The Baumes laws consist of a series of amendments to the code of criminal procedure and penal law of New York. These laws went into effect July i,1926. They…

    • What is Sing Sing? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      No description found for this item.

    • How did "Labrador" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      No description found for this item.

    • Does moonlight ever produce rainbows? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      Rainbows by moonlight, known as moonbows, are unusual but not rare phenomena. Aristotle referred to lunar bows about twenty-two hundred years ago, and they are…

    • Why is Rome called the Eternal City? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      Rome was known as the Eternal City even among the ancient Romans themselves. It was so called because the Roman people thought that no matter what happened to…

    • What famous Scottish king was a leper? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      Robert the Bruce (1274-1329), liberator of Scotland and King of that country from 1315 until his death, was a victim of leprosy. The Scottish King had made a…

    • Does snow enrich the soil? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      No description found for this item.

    • Does an electric fan lower the temperature of a room? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      An electric fan running in a perfectly insulated and hermetically . sealed room would not make the air in the room cooler, as commonly supposed. In fact,…

    • What is a common-law marriage? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      A common-law marriage is a marriage by mutual consent alone, without license or ceremony of any kind, either ecclesiastical or civil Unions of this kind are…

    • Can stars be seen in the daytime from a well? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      The popular belief that stars' and planets can be seen in the daytime from the bottom of a well or shaft is true only to a very limited extent. A person…

    • What does "fort" in "fortnight" mean? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      Fortnight is a contraction of fourteen nights. The latter phrase, in the sense of a period of two weeks, was used in England as early as 1000 A.D., when it was…

    • What is the belief about the seventh son of a seventh son? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      It was once widely believed that the seventh son of a seventh son (or child or either sex as some supposed) was endowed with notable talent and supernatural…

    • Did the United States pay France rent for trenches? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      There is a persistent but unfounded popular belief in the United States that the American government paid the French government a rental for the use of battle…

    • Why are policemen called cops? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      Cop as applied to policemen is believed to be derived from the old English verb to cop, meaning to catch, to. get hold of, to nab. This meaning of cop survives…

    • What is ambergris? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      Ambergris (pronounced am-ber-grees) is derived from French ambre gris and literally signifies "gray amber." Ambergris is a solid, fatty, waxlike substance…

    • Can snakes poison themselves? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:10

      Naturalists are agreed that venomous snakes are immune to their own poison when it is swallowed. There is a difference of opinion, however, as to whether…

    • What is a Creole? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      Creole is used in so many different senses that it is hard to define. In fact the term has been so distorted by usage that it is not safe to employ it except…

    • What is the "codfish aristocracy"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      Codfish aristocracy is now often applied to persons who, lacking in real culture, make a vulgar display of recently acquired wealth. Sometimes the term is also…

    • Are any Americans buried in Westminster Abbey? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      No description found for this item.

    • What is the surname of David Lloyd George? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      No description found for this item.

    • Are elephants afraid of mice? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      That elephants are particularly afraid of mice is a widespread belief. In The Lamentable Tragedy of Locrine, a play written about 1595 and formerly often…

    • Can snakes bite through leather shoes? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      Such snakes as the bushmaster, rattlesnake and Gaboon viper have long, powerful fangs and are able, under favorable circumstances, to bite through soft-leather…

    • Which, is correct, "spic and span" or "spick and span"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      Spick and span is the correct spelling of this common phrase. It is often but erroneously written spic and span, owing apparently to a mistaken notion of its…

    • Why is the shamrock Ireland's national emblem? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      The shamrock is believed to have become the national emblem of Ireland as the result of a traditional incident in the life of St. Patrick. The patron saint of…

    • Is quicksilver mined? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      Quicksilver is the popular name of mercury, a heavy silver-white element. It is unique among the metallic elements- in that it remains liquid at ordinary…

    • How did the derogatory term "cracker" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      "Cracker" is an old term that was used primarily in the South, especially in Georgia and Florida, to poor whites and hill dwellers. The term in this sense…

    • How did a spider save Scotland? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      In 1306 Robert Bruce, or Robert the Bruce, was crowned King of Scotland. Soon afterward his forces were routed by the English and he fled from the country,…

    • Do hogs cut their throats in swimming? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      It is commonly believed that hogs will cut their throats by striking them with the sharp points of their cloven front feet if they swim any considerable…

    • Which, is correct, "roach" or "cockroach"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      The original name for this insect pest is cockroach. Roach is merely a curtailed form of cockroach. This word is not a. compound of cock . and roach, as many…

    • How do worms get into chestnuts? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      The so-called worms often found in chestnuts are the larvae of the chestnut, weevil, a yellowish beetle with a long beak or snout. During the blooming season,…

    • How are death masks made? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      A death mask is made by applying some kind of plaster, such as plaster of Paris, to the face after the skin has been treated with oil to prevent the plaster…

    • What is a cow tree? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      No description found for this item.

    • How did "fan" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      Fan, in the sense of an- enthusiast over baseball, football, radio or any other sport, amusement, entertainment or avocation, is modern and is believed to be a…

    • What is a "shivaree"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      Charivari, in the sense of a mock serenade of a newly married couple, is popularly spelled and pronounced shivaree in the United States. It is a French term…

    • How did "booze" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      Booze is not a word of recent coinage, as commonly supposed. It is an example of a good word that degenerated into slang. In varying forms the term has been…

    • What country coined platinum money? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      In 1828 the Russian government began the coinage of platinum money. Platinum was produced in considerable quantities in the Ural Mountains'in Russia and its…

    • What was the Spanish Main? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      Spanish Main was originally applied to the'Spanish mainland colonies on the northeast coast of South America between the mouth of the Orinoco River and the…

    • How did "cutting a dido" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      This phrase means to play the mischief, to cut up, to cut capers. In some sections of the United States dance a dido is used instead of cut a dido. Dido as…

    • What is the philosopher's stone? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      No description found for this item.

    • What is meant by. Robin Hood's barn? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      Robin Hood's barn is the great out-of-doors and alludes to the fact that Robin Hood, the legendary English outlaw and ballad hero, stabled his horses under the…

    • Who were the Blue Devils? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      The French soldiers belonging to the Chasseurs Alpins were called Blue Devils by the Germans during the First World War because of their dark blue uniforms and…

    • How did "bylaw" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      By in bylaw is believed to be derived from the Old Danish word by or bye, meaning "town" or "dwelling place," which still survives in -numer: ous English place…

    • What is a bull bat? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      Bull bat is a popular name for the nighthawk, although it is also sometimes applied to the whippoorwill, a closely related species. The term is used in the…

    • Why is Latin America so called? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      The countries in the New World to the south of the United States are called Latin America because the prevailing languages are of Latin origin. France, Spain,…

    • What is the White Slave Act? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      The White Slave Act, more properly the White Slave Traffic Act, was passed by Congress in 1910 under the interstate commerce clause of the Federal Constitution.…

    • Do bears hug their enemies to death? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:11

      The proverbial hugging propensity of bears is probably a myth, notwithstanding a vast amount of alleged testimony to the contrary. Literature, reference works…

    • What is the southernmost point in the United States proper? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      The most southern point of land in the continental United States is in the vicinity of East Gape, Florida, at approximate latitude 25 degrees, 04 minutes.…

    • How do the Curb Exchange and the Stock Exchange differ? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      The New York Curb Exchange is a market for securities not listed on the New York Stock Exchange. There is no essential difference between the Stock Exchange…

    • Why is a necktie called a cravat? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      Cravat is derived from Cravate, the French name of the inhabitants of Croatia, who in English are called Croats (pronounced Jcro-ats). Khrvat is the Serbo-Croat…

    • What is a "thank ye ma'am?" by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      No description found for this item.

    • What do moles eat? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      Common garden moles are insectivorous, not vegetarian. Contrary to common belief, they very seldom eat vegetable food of any kind, their chief diet consisting…

    • How did Greenland get its name? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      Since the greater part of Greenland, the largest island in the world, is covered with ice and snow Wiu'teland would have been a more appropriate name for that…

    • How was Cape Horn named? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      General William Tecumseh Sherman says in his Memoirs: "In time we saw Cape Horn; an island rounded like an oven, after which it takes its name (Ornos) oven."…

    • What does U.S.S. mean in ship names? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      U.S.S. (USS) preceding the names of vessels are the abbreviation of United States Ship. It is frequently but erroneously stated that the second S stands for…

    • What does F.O.B. mean? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      F.O.B is the abbreviation of the commercial phrase free on board. When used without a modifier, F.O.B means that goods are to be delivered, at the seller's…

    • Does odor have weight? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      Odor is the name of the sensation produced when certain substances come in contact with the olfactory region. The term is also applied to the collective…

    • What is the fiscal year? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      The fiscal year is the twelvemonth period between one annual time of settling accounts and another. The fiscal year of the United States Government begins July…

    • How did "show the white feather" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      To show the white feather, which means to prove cowardly, retreat or back down, is a product of the cockpit. It was suggested by the old belief that a white…

    • What is the meaning of "maru" in Japanese ship names? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      Maru, pronounced mah-roo, is used in the names of Japanese merchant vessels to distinguish them from warships and other craft. For instance, Japanese name…

    • Is the silver fox a distinct species? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      The silver fox is not a separate species. It is merely a phase of the red fox. The black fox, the platinum fox and the so-called cross fox also belong to.the…

    • Why is "colonel" pronounced "kurnel"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:12

      Colonel is merely the English form of Italian colonello, .diminutive of colonna, "column," and literally means "little column." .At first the little column or…

    • Was Cleopatra a blonde or brunette? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      There is just as much reason for supposing that Cleopatra was a blonde as there is for supposing that she was a brunette. According to the popular conception,…

    • Why is a football field called the gridiron? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      A gridiron is a grated utensil on which food is broiled over a fire. Hence, figuratively, any network, as of pipes, railway tracks, etc., is called a gridiron.…

    • How many bees are there in a hive? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      Authorities differ widely on the number of honeybees composing a hive or colony. It has been estimated that a swarm of bees when it leaves the mother hive…

    • Why is a ten-cent piece called a dime? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      Dime is derived from the Latin decent ("ten") or decimus ("a tenth"). In, the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries dime was applied in England to the tithe or…

    • Which is correct, "Haiti" or "Santo Domingo"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      No description found for this item.

    • When does a town, become a city? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      Town and city in the sense of an urban community are relative terms and hard to 'distinguish exactly. In the most general sense of the terms, a city is merely…

    • What is meant by the black ox? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      The black ox symbolizes old age, ill luck, care, adversity or trouble and misfortune in general. "The black ox Las not trod on his nor her foot" is a proverbial…

    • Do bees know their master? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      Entomologists hold that there is nothing to the common notion that honeybees recognize the beekeeper and distinguish him from other individuals. Although some…

    • Which is correct, Abyssinia or Ethiopia? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      Ethiopia is the ancient name of the country in northeastern Africa. It is of Greek origin and literally means the "land of burnt-face people," alluding to the…

    • To what mountain, system do the Ozarks belong? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      Geologists do not regard the Ozark Mountains as part of either the Rocky or the Appalachian systems, but as an independent and distinct unit. The Ozark Plateau…

    • Where is "the roof of the world"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      The Pamir mountain region in Central Asia is called the roof of the world because of its great altitude. In India ths Pamirs' are called Bam-idunya, literally…

    • Why are June marriages considered lucky? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      In the United States and Canada as well as in many other countries June is the favorite marriage month; in New Zealand and Australia as well as some other…

    • Why are ship compartments called "staterooms"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      No description found for this item.

    • What are equinoctial storms? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      Equinoctial storms are storms popularly supposed to occur at the time of the spring and fall equinoxes. Equinox is derived from Latin and signifies "equal…

    • What are minnows? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 05:14

      Minnow, often corrupted into minnie, is popularly applied in the ; United States to any small fish irrespective of species. In British usage the term is…

    • Who invented the postal card? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      The use of postal cards was first suggested in 1865 by Heinrich von Stephan (1831-1897) when he was director of the Royal Prussian Post. Later Stephan became…

    • How did the New Orleans Mardi Gras originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      Mardi Gras, pronounced mar-dee grah, literally means "fat Tuesday." It is the French name of Shrove Tuesday, the day before Ash Wednesday, the beginning of…

    • How did "thumbs down" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      We are all familiar with the meaning of "thumbs up" and "thumbs down." Thumbs up means approval and thumbs down, disapproval. These hand gestures are believed…

    • What causes fresh-water springs in the ocean? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      Fresh-water springs in the ocean have been noted by travelers and navigators for centuries. In fact the, existence of such ocean springs has been known since…

    • Does the sap of a tree rise in the spring? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      That the sap of a tree rises in the spring -and goes down in the fall is a common but 'erroneous notion. In the spring there is an increased circulation of…

    • Can moles see? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      Whether ordinary moles can see has been a debatable question for centuries and is not yet finally settled. In his Vulgar Errors (1646) Sir Thomas Browne took…

    • Why is a quarter called "two bits"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      In England bit has been applied to small coins for centuries. The term at one time was thieves' slang for money in general. Thomas Dekkar so used it in A…

    • What is meant by pleading the baby act? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      According to law, a person not of age cannot be bound by contract. If a minor makes a contract and does not abide, by the agreement he may plead his minority…

    • Is it easier to lift a weight with a large or small pulley? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      Other things being equal, a weight can be lifted more easily with a large pulley than with a small one. Less power is required to drive or pull a vehicle with…

    • What is a madstone? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      No description found for this item.

    • What makes the jumping bean jump? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      Mexican jumping bean, jumping bean and broncno bean are popular names given to the separate cells of the seed pods of several varieties of swamp shrubs native…

    • Why does it rain harder after a flash of lightning? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      That it often rains harder after a vivid flash of lightning and heavy peal of thunder is a fact well known to meteorologists. Strictly speaking, however, the…

    • What is the lightest substance known? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      The element hydrogen is the lightest substance known to science. Its specific gravity, compared to air, is 0.0695. Helium, with a specific gravity of 0.139, is…

    • Does air have weight? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      Air is a substance and all substances have weight. Air, however, is very light. A column of air an inch square extending from sea level upward as far as the…

    • What determined the width of standard gauge railroads? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:05

      The standard gauge railroad is four feet eight and one half inches wide, measured from the inside of one rail to the inside of the other. This width was…

    • How many square feet of skin does the body contain? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      It is estimated that there are from fourteen to eighteen square feet of skin on the average adult human body. One investigator placed the figure as high as…

    • Why does "T.L." mean a compliment? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      The letters T.L., when used to mean a compliment, are the abbreviation of trade last. These words acquired the meaning of an offer to give a compliment in…

    • How did "dead as a doornail" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Anything stone dead is said to be dead as a doornail. The conventional explanation of this phrase is that doornail was an old name for the plate or knob on…

    • What is ginseng used for? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Ginseng is not used in the United States to any considerable extent. A negligible quantity is used by Chinese in America and a trifling amount by makers of…

    • Do snakes live in Ireland? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      There are no native snakes in Ireland. The viviparous lizard is the only reptile found native on the Emerald Isle. Occasionally snakes are brought into Ireland…

    • How did "laconic" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Laconic means "brief," "concise," "pithy." It is an adjective formed from Laconia, the name of an ancient Greek country of which Lacedaemon or Sparta was the…

    • What distinguishes a blond from a brunet? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Blond and brunet are relative terms. It is impossible to draw a sharp distinction between them. Many persons have both, blond and brunet characteristics.…

    • What relation to you is your cousin's child? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Cousin is derived through French from Latin consobrinus, "the child of one's mother's sister." Consobrinus was formed from con and soror ("sister"). The term…

    • What is the capital of Switzerland? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Bern is the political capital of the Swiss Confederation. Many people erroneously suppose that Geneva is. From the close of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815 until…

    • Who discovered that the earth is a sphere? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      That the earth is a sphere was one of the discoveries made by Pythagoras, a Greek philosopher who lived in the sixth century, B.C. The researches of Anaximander…

    • What are the seven seas? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      The seven seas is a figurative term denoting all the seas and oceans of the world. It is often explained that the seven seas are the Arctic, the Antarctic, the…

    • Which is correct, "cent" or "penny"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Penny is not the official and legal designation of any coin minted by the United States. It is merely a colloquial name for the American onecent piece. Penny,…

    • Do earthworms turn into lightning bugs? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      That earthworms turn into lightning bugs or fireflies is a common myth in some sections of the United States. No doubt this curious belief arose from the fact…

    • If an earthworm is cut in two will the parts survive? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      The power of earthworms to regenerate missing parts/though remarkable, is often exaggerated. For instance, it is repeatedly stated that a tail may grow a new…

    • Who was the last British king to fight in battle? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      George II, who. was King of Great Britain from 1727 to 1760 and regarded himself as a military genius, was the last British sovereign to take an active part in…

    • How do shears and scissors differ? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      In the United States shears and scissors are often used interchangeably. As a rule, however, shears is employed when the implement is large and scissors when…

    • Which is correct, "these" or "this" molasses? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Molasses is derived through Spanish from Latin mellaceus, "honeylike." Since, the singular and plural forms are spelled the same, the word is often construed…

    • Where is the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      The Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes lies beyond Mount Katmai on the Alaskan mainland across Shelikof Strait, from .Kodiak Island. From the floor of this…

    • What is spontaneous combustion? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Spontaneous combustion is the ignition of a combustible material without the application of external heat or flame. The self-generated heat produced by cotton…

    • How long do elephants live?  by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      It is difficult to obtain accurate information as to the extreme age reached by elephants in the wild state. There is no positive evidence that an elephant has…

    • What is New Jersey tea? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      New Jersey tea is the popular name of Ceanothus americanus, a white-flowered plant that grows abundantly in the northeastern part of the United States. The…

    • What is meant by cleaning the Augean stables? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Augeas '(pronounced aw-j'ee-us) was a legendary king of Elis in Greece who possessed a herd of three thousand sacred oxen whose stalls had not been cleaned for…

    • Who were the druids? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      The druids were the priests, bards, prophets and wise men among the ' ancient Celts in Gaul, Britain and Ireland. Owing to their practice of teaching orally…

    • What is the Grand Bank? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      The Grand Bank is a great shoal in the Atlantic Ocean lying about one hundred miles off the southeast coast of Newfoundland and famous throughout the world as…

    • What is a drumhead court-martial? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Any summary trial is now sometimes called a drumhead court-martial. Originally the name was given only to a summary and hasty court-martial called to try an…

    • What are rhinestones? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Rhinestones are artificial colorless gems of high luster and cut to imitate diamonds. Their chief use is in the manufacture of cheap jewelry and accordingly…

    • What is meant by Plimsoll's mark? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Plimsoll's mark consists of a disk and letters painted in white on the outside of a British ship's hull to indicate the limit to which the vessel may be loaded…

    • What is the Iron Gate in the Danube? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      No description found for this item.

    • Where in America can one see the Atlantic and Pacific? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      Both the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, which is regarded as part of the North Atlantic, can be seen on a clear day from the summit of Mount Izaru, an…

    • What is the plural of "ski"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:06

      The plural of ski is either ski or skis. Frequently the plural is erroneously written "skiis," owing no doubt to the fact that the double "i" occurs in skiing,…

    • What is quartered oak? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      Quartered oak is oak lumber that has been quarter sawed. It is not, like bird's-eye maple, a wood with a peculiar grain. In order to produce the quarter-grain…

    • Why are opals considered unlucky? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      The origin of the superstition that the opal is an unlucky stone and will bring misfortune and ill luck to its owner is obscure. Among the ancients the opal…

    • What is a hoop snake? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      One of the most persistent snake myths in the United States deals with reptiles known as the stinging snake or hoop snake. This snake, according to the belief,…

    • How is "Staten" in "Staten Island" pronounced? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      No description found for this item.

    • Can horses sleep while standing? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      Horses have the ability to sleep while standing. In 1943 Professor C. F. Winchester, member of the animal husbandry faculty at the University of Missouri, said…

    • What causes pounding in hot-water pipes? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      The pounding and banging in hot-water and steam pipes is called water hammer or hydraulic shock. This snapping noise is produced by moving water thrown against…

    • What does "savvy" mean? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      Savvy or savvey is an American corruption of Spanish sabe, a form of the verb saber, meaning "to know." "Do you savvy?" is equivalent to Spanish "gSabe Usted?"…

    • Do crows fly in a straight line? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      It is commonly believed that the crow flies forward in a straight line. Hence the phrase as the crow flies, meaning in a straight line from starting point to…

    • How did "kibitzer" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      A kibitzer is a person who meddles in the affairs of other people, particularly one who, while not a player himself, watches a card game from behind the…

    • What are the Seven Wonders of the World? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      The Seven Wonders of the World is the name given to a group of remarkable works of art and engineering that were popular among the ancients. It is supposed…

    • How did "bunk" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      No description found for this item.

    • Where is the city of St. John's in British America? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      Three cities with similar names in British North America are frequently confused in the United States. St. John's is not in Canada. It is the capital and most…

    • Does the pilot snake pilot other snakes? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      The pilot snake, Elaphe obsoleta, gets its popular name from the curious belief that it precedes rattlesnakes and warns them of the approach of danger.…

    • What is a-white elephant? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      So-called white elephants are merely albinistic Indian elephants in which much of the usual dark pigment is absent from the skin, giving it a pale gray or…

    • Who were the tailors of Tooley Street? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      While George Canning (1770-1827) was Prime Minister of England, several tailors met in a house on Tooley Street, London, for the purpose of redressing popular…

    • Why is the guinea pig so called? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      The name of the guinea pig, which is a native of South America, is one of the unsolved mysteries of etymology. Several plausible theories have been advanced to…

    • Why is there more lightning in summer? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      Electrical storms are generated by sudden and decided changes in atmospheric temperature. The upper atmosphere is always cold "and such changes are much less…

    • Will the milk of all mammals produce butter? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      The milk of all mammals, including the human species, contains a fatty constituent similar to the butter in cow's milk, and, to quote the United States Bureau…

    • How did "passing the buck" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      This expression, which means shifting responsibility, originated in the cardroom. In various card games a counter or marker is placed on the table before one…

    • When did the round "s" supplant the long "s"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      The modern form of the letter s began to be used in print to the exclusion of the old s form or long s about the time of the American Revolution. Before that…

    • Who was the Laughing Murderer of Verdun? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      Frederick William, Crown Prince of Germany from the' time of his birth in 1882 until the downfall of the Hohenzollerns in 1918, was called the "Laughing…

    • How did "gunny sack" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      Gunny in gunny sack is an Anglicized form of Hindu and Sanskrit goni, meaning sack or bag. Because bags for gross commodities were made on a large scale in…

    • How did "son of a gun" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      No description found for this item.

    • What is a fourflusher? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      A fourflusher, in common parlance, is a bluffer, braggart or cheat. The term originated in the popular indoor diversion known as poker. In . this card game a…

    • What is an inferiority complex? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      Complex is used by psychologists to denote, according to Webster's International dictionary, "a system of desires and memories, especially a repressed and…

    • Do snakes go blind during dog days? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      There is only a grain of truth in the old belief that snakes go blind during dog days. Before sloughing its skin a snake assumes a dull grayish color and…

    • What is the meaning of "and/or"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      No description found for this item.

    • How do broadswords differ from small swords? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      The broadsword has a long cutting edge and usually an obtuse or blunt" point. It is a distinctively military sword and was originally so called because of its…

    • What time of day is evening? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      No description found for this item.

    • Can a peacock be a female? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:07

      No description found for this item.

    • How did "stealing thunder" originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      John Dennis (1657-1734), an English dramatist and critic, was responsible for the expression to steal one's thunder. In 1709 his play Appius and Virginia was…

    • Is steam visible? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      Strictly speaking, steam is invisible. The term is properly applied to the transparent gas or vapor into which water is converted when heated to the boiling…

    • Is part of a ten-dollar bill redeemable at face value? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      Three-fifths or more of a mutilated United States paper currency bill, note or certificate is redeemable at face value by the United States Treasury Department.…

    • Why is Yorkshire divided into ridings? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      No description found for this item.

    • What birds are trained to fish for their masters? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      In China,. Japan and other parts of the Orient the large sea birds known as cormorants have been trained to fish for man since time immemorial. These birds…

    • What is a weed? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      Weed, which is of unknown origin, is a relative term. In the most widely accepted sense, a weed is any troublesome and useless plant growing on cultivated…

    • When did Oslo become capital of Norway? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      Oslo, or Opslo, was the ancient name of the capital of Norway. According to Norwegian tradition, the city was founded in 1048 by King Harald Haardraade. By the…

    • Why do gunners open their mouths when firing cannon? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      Gunners often open their mouths to protect their eardrums while firing large guns. When the mouth is open the air waves set in motion by the discharge of the…

    • How is "Eyre" pronounced in "Jane Eyre"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      No description found for this item.

    • Where do goldfish come from? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      Goldfish as we know them do not exist anywhere in the wild state. They are a product of long years of selective breeding. The wild fish from which goldfish…

    • How big were the largest hailstones on record? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      The maximum size of hailstones is not known positively for the simple reason that trained observers are not often on the spot to measure them ' when they fall.…

    • Why is the moon compared to green cheese? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      To say a person believes the moon is made of green cheese is to ridicule his credulity, it being presumed that such a person would believe the most absurd…

    • Is Newfoundland a part of Canada? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      No description found for this item.

    • How did Derby in horse racing originate? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      No description found for this item.

    • Why are X rays so named? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      The X ray was discovered in 1895 by a German Professor of physics at the University of Wurzburg in Germany. His name was Wilhelm Konrad Rontgen. It is said…

    • What is the origin of "A Number One"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      A Number One in the sense of prime, superior or first-rate originated with a symbol used in classifying ships in Lloyd's Register of British and Foreign…

    • What is China's Sorrow? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      Hwang Ho, or the Yellow River, is popularly known as China's Sorrow because of its devastating floods. This remarkable stream is one of the largest rivers in…

    • Can fish hear? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      No description found for this item.

    • What became of the passenger pigeons? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      Two hundred years ago the passenger pigeon, a migratory pigeon slightly larger than the turtledove, was probably the most numerous bird throughout most of the…

    • Where is the Land of the Midnight Sun? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      The sun shining at midnight in the arctic or Antarctic summer is known as the midnight sun. Norway is popularly called the "Land of the Midnight Sun" because…

    • What is the golden rose? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      The golden rose is an artificial ornament of pure gold set with gems and made by skilled artificers. It is blessed by the Pope on the fourth (Laetare) Sunday…

    • Which is cooler, black or white clothing? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      Many people believe that light-colored clothing is cooler than dark colored clothing irrespective of the time it is worn. Such is not the case. Assuming the…

    • Where do elephants go to die? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      It is often said that the remains of elephants that die a natural death are never found in their native haunts and that the question is a mystery to scientists.…

    • Who are the Anzacs? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      This is a name often applied collectively to the people of Australia and New Zealand. It originated during the First World War. The Australian and New Zealand…

    • What is the origin of the bridal veil? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      The wedding or bridal veil is believed to be a survival of an ancient superstition dating back to the time of the Greeks and Romans, if not much earlier. It…

    • Why are ultraconservatives called Bourbons? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      The Bourbons were a royal family who ruled France from 1589 to 1848,with interruptions caused by the French Revolution and the Napoleonic regime. Members of…

    • Do trees die of old age? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      No close parallel exists between trees and animals in respect to maturity and longevity. Trees do not die of old age in the same sense that higher animals and…

    • What does it mean "to turn state's evidence"? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      In American legal language evidence for the government, people or state in criminal prosecutions is called state's evidence, In English law evidence for the…

    • What great orator put pebbles in his mouth? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      When the ancient Athenian orator Demosfhenes (384?-322 B.C.) was a young man he had a frail body, weak lungs and a shrill voice. Plutarch tells us that…

    • Who was the Laughing Philosopher? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      Democritus (4607-3617 B.C.), a Greek thinker in the time of Socrates, was known as the "Laughing Philosopher." Just why he was so called is not known for…

    • What is a berserker rage? by: Mike

      March 19, 2010, 06:08

      In Norse mythology Berserk was the nickname of the grandson of the eight-handed Starkadder. He always went into battle without armor and was famed for the…

    • Is Great Britain Part of Europe? by: Mike

      April 6, 2010, 02:57

      Great Britain, although an island, is so close to the continent of Europe that it is generally regarded as being a part of it.  Scientists are of the opinion…

    • Do Monkeys Make Bridges? by: Mike

      April 6, 2010, 03:04

      It is often said that monkeys sometimes cross streams by means of monkey bridges. According to the popular notion, the monkeys take hold of one anothers tails…